Recent Posts by Noah Slater

Open Cloud Computing Interface: An Overview

Open Cloud Interface

Cloud APIs allow engineers to control all layers of the cloud, from provisioning new VMs to altering specific software services. There are several competing cloud APIs in existence today. Learning how they came to be, and how they’re faring against one another, can give a deeper insight into the challenges presently faced by cloud computing in general. In this post we take a detailed look at one such API developed by the Open Grid Forum.

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WordPress in the Cloud: Part 3, Image Uploads

Wordpress in the Cloud

In the previous post in this series, we looked at how to install a WordPress theme manually to a WordPress instance deployed in the cloud and in the first post in the series, how to configure WordPress to run on Engine Yard. In this post, we’ll look at a contrasting technique, using the admin interface to install an Amazon Web Services Simple Storage System (S3) plugin.

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WordPress in the Cloud: Part 2, Themes

Wordpress in the Cloud

In the previous post in this series, we explained how to deploy WordPress to a production cloud environment. As an app which wasn’t specifically designed for the cloud, WordPress has to be handled specially to make this work. In the conclusion to a previous series, we outlined a solution that does this with the minimum effort and yet great reliability. In the third post in this series, we look at a contrasting technique, using the admin interface to install an Amazon Web Services Simple Storage System (S3) plugin.

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WordPress in the Cloud: Part 1, The Basics

Wordpress in the Cloud

This is the first post in a series that will show you how to configure WordPress to run on Engine Yard, a cloud hosting provider. As we go, we’ll discuss common issues and the best practices for addressing them.

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The Long Tail of Open Source (And You)

It is a common story: a company has some internal software that is draining resources, and they think “Aha! We’ll open source it, and then the community will maintain it for us.” Which would be true, if there was a community. But you do not get a community for free by typing git push for the first time. You have to build one. And building one takes effort. A lot of effort.

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Why Your App Won’t Work In The Cloud

There are two kinds of apps for the cloud: ones that work and ones that don’t. The ones that work are called Twelve Factor apps, and they work because they were written specifically for the cloud. We call the ones that don’t work legacy apps. And these are designed to run on traditional VPS hosts.

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Share Nothing, Scale Everything

In the previous post in this series, we explained how the shared-nothing architecture places additional constraints on cloud app developers. We also explained how embracing these constraints enables apps to have high scalability and high availability.

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Functions, Threads, and Processes. What's Next? Cows

cows-fork

In the previous post in this series, we discovered that setting up a server before you even boot it is not only possible, but gives enormous productivity rewards in a cloud architecture. In this post, we look at the four essential principles of designing your app for the cloud.

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Configure Before You Boot

server-cows

In the previous post in this series, we learned how the pets vs. cattle metaphor teaches us a new way of approaching cloud server architecture. Instead of unique pets which require constant, individual care, we focus instead on cattle which are identical, homogenous units that can be added en masse and removed with ease. Cattle servers are, in other words, fungible resources.

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Discovering Our Community Work

A few weeks ago, I published a post called An Open Source Grant with a Difference, in which I announced that we are using Gittip to donate $10,000 to the community.

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